Dating people from work

People who work together also tend to live within a reasonable dating distance, and they see each other on a daily basis. In early SHRM surveys, 43 percent of HR staff said that they had experienced office romances in their workplace.

In other surveys, 55 percent of the HR professionals who responded said that marriage is the most likely outcome of the office romances they experienced.

Regardless of whether your employer has a workplace romance policy in place, you’ll want to keep your relationship off workplace radar as much as possible.

If you and your partner have contact on a regular basis, keep the contact professional. Avoid talking privately in corners or behind closed doors, regularly eating lunch together without other coworkers, and -- above all -- touching.

The SHRM research also found that some companies forbid hookups between their employees and clients or customers, and 11 percent forbid romances between their employees and employees of their competitors.

Respondents to the SHRM surveys who discouraged or forbade dating in the workplace cited concerns with potential sexual harassment claims, retaliation, claims that a relationship was not consensual, civil suits and workplace disharmony if the relationship should end.

Thirty-three percent of organizations forbid romances between employees who report to the same supervisor, and 12 percent won’t even allow employees in different departments to date.

But when a couple is genuinely serious about dating and building a relationship, popular opinion is more favorable.

Amy Nicole Salvaggio, an assistant professor of psychology at the University of Tulsa, conducted a study of nearly 200 full-time workers in a variety of workplaces.

Traditional places like church, family events, and leisure time activities don’t present the same pool of candidates as they did in earlier times.

The workplace provides a preselected pool of people who share at least one important area of common ground.

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